How to Mix and Render Using Audacity: One Caution

In music production, mixing your edited tracks down to a final track for export is necessary for a number of reasons. While mixing and rendering your podcast tracks in Audacity isn’t always necessary, it’s recommended. For one thing, It gives you a look at the final waveform before it’s exported. Other benefits include more consistency for things like loudness leveling and other mastering techniques. But there’s one caution you need to be aware of if you use mix and render in Audacity.

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The Audacity Label Track

Let’s take a closer look at the label track in Audacity. In the last video, I showed you one function of the label track in Audacity as a tool for separating groups of synced tracks. In this video, let’s talk about using the Audacity label track as a label track.

Audacity Sync-Lock Tracks

Let’s talk about how to synchronize your tracks in Audacity. Did you know you can create groups of synced tracks in Audacity that are synchronized independent of each other? That’s one function of the label track. Let’s take a closer look…

Be sure to check out my full Audacity course if you’re interested in diving deeper into Audacity for podcasting:

Audacity Bootcamp: Beginner to Advanced.

This Lapel Mic is Unidirectional

NOTE: The Zoom H6 course I reference in this video is no longer available. I finally found a lapel mic that’s unidirectional. Its the JK MIC-J 055 Lapel Microphone and it’s so much better than other lapel mics I’ve found in this price range. I used it in this video so you could hear the audio quality for yourself. I didn’t do any post production on the audio other than loudness leveling. At the time of this recording, it runs $29 on Amazon. Here’s the link:

Mike