What’s New in Audacity 3.0.0: Macro Import, Export, and Comments

Audacity 3.0.0 gives us the ability to import and export our macros and to add comments in a macro step. This is a big deal if you use macros like I do.

What’s New in Audacity 3.0.0: Project Backups

There’s a new feature in Audacity 3.0.0 that’s pretty sweet. It gives you the ability to make a quick duplicate copy of your project at any stage of production. This is good if you want to save your project at different intervals with different names (i.e. different version numbers) and keep the saved backups untouched as you forge ahead on the original project. The uses for this are almost unlimited. Let me show you how it works.

What’s New in Audacity 3.0.0: File Names and File Structure

This is the first of five videos I’ll be posting on what’s new in the just-released version 3.0.0 of Audacity. This video addresses the naming convention and the new file structure in this latest version. Version 3.0.0 of Audacity saves projects with a .aup3 file name extension. This is different than previous versions of Audacity and it’s important to understand the difference, so let’s talk about it in this video.

My Latest Project

I’ve been busy on a new project that I started in January of this year. It’s a collection of historic images, photos, and video interviews concerning the demolition of a place I used to work near the town I grew up in. It’s pretty much on auto pilot now with the exception of occasional video interviews and regular postings of construction and demolition photos. Check it out:

Just a reminder, you can find my on-demand video course on Audacity editing for podcasters at:

I hope to see you there!

What’s the Difference Between Loudness and Volume?

In the last video I talked briefly about the difference between loudness and the amplify effect in Audacity. Let’s put another piece of the puzzle together by talking about the difference between loudness and volume. I talked about this in a previous video but the question comes up a lot so I want to address it again, emphasizing that loudness is a component of the waveform. These are not the same thing. Loudness is embedded in the waveform and volume is not. Let’s talk about it.

You’ll find my course, Audacity Bootcamp: Beginner to Advanced, which consists of 6+ hours of on-demand videos by visiting https://www.udemy.com/course/audacity-bootcamp-beginner-to-advanced/?referralCode=2929789AFB4340922D9A

What’s The Difference Between Amplify and LUFS in Audacity

What’s the difference between the amplify effect and the LUFS effect in Audacity? Can I use amplify in place of loudness leveling? The biggest problem with using Amplify to make levels consistent in an audio track, is the amount of time it’s going to take to fix it. You’re going to have to go to each spot in your project where the audio is either real low or too high and apply a different amount of amplification to each one.

Applying Loudness Leveling is much better and much easier. It sets the overall loudness of the track or project to the specified LUFS level from start to finish one time, eliminating the need to find and correct every variation in amplitude individually.

I talk briefly about the Auphonic Desktop Leveler in this video. It’s a stand-alone program that levels the audio you export from Audacity, along with performing other behind-the-scenes audio production. I use the Auphonic Desktop Leveler on every piece of audio that I export out of Audacity. I’ll be doing a separate video on how to use it soon but in the meantime, I’ve included a link to it in the event you want more info. I’m not associated with Auphonic in any way. It’s simply a good product that I use and recommend.

https://auphonic.com/leveler​

Thanks for watching!